Can You Test for Male Infertility at Home?

Category: Male Infertility, Low Sperm Count | Posted on Sep 8, 2016
Can You Test for Male Infertility at Home?

Fertility testing products are typically more common for women than for men, going hand-in-hand with the incorrect notion that infertility is solely a female-driven issue. Men and women are actually equal contributors to infertility cases in couples who are unable to conceive after six months to a year of trying.

A new battery-powered male fertility test kit called Trak will be available for over-the-counter purchase as early as next month. Trak is a “male fertility testing system” that can help determine a man’s sperm count from the privacy of his own home. The sperm count is tallied when used in coordination with a free app. The app also provides lifestyles change recommendations designed to optimize male fertility.

Men are certainly able to consult with a fertility specialist, but innovations like Trak offer an opportunity for them to get a starting point on their own. Even if fertility testing sounds like a far-off need for someone in their 20s, it’s never too early to start caring about fertility, and a home test could serve as an initial indicator of any issues. A man can test his sperm at any time, whether before he starts trying to build a family, during unsuccessful attempts to achieve pregnancy, or before considering storing samples with a sperm bank.

What if my sperm count is low?
Regardless of whether you undergo an at-home sperm count test or if you visit with a fertility specialist like Dr. Martin Bastuba of the Male Fertility & Sexual Medicine Specialists (MFS), should your results display a low or nonexistent sperm count (azoospermia), then you will require a consultation with a specialist if you wish to build your family.

Low sperm count (oligospermia) treatment is possible, though treatment varies greatly depending on each individual since low sperm count can be caused by different factors. For example, if low sperm count is caused by a urinary infection, then medication will be used to clear the infection and improve overall sperm count. If a low sperm count is due to poor lifestyle habits, then your provider will recommend a better diet and exercise routine. For other cases, treatment will come in the form of assisted reproductive technology (ART) or third-party reproduction via a sperm donor.

The Male Fertility & Sexual Medicine Specialists encourage men to research their options regarding sperm count testing and to consult with an experienced male fertility specialist with any questions or concerns.

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